The Documents

The Development of the American Character

Notes on the State of Virginia

Notes on the State of Virginia

Notes on the State of Virginia

Short Description

Jefferson’s only book-length work, Notes on the State of Virginia was his response to a French dignitary regarding questions about Virginia. The work is still considered a valuable source of information about the natural history of Virginia as well as about 18th century political and social life.

Remnant Trust Description

Jefferson’s only book-length work. Graduate of the College of William and Mary, Jefferson was admitted to the bar in 1767 and sat in the Virginia House of Burgesses from 1769 to 1775. As a delegate to the Continental Congress (1775-1776), he drafted the Declaration of Independence. While he was a member to the Virginia House of Delegates (1776-79), he supported the abolition of primogeniture and entail, the establishment of religious freedom, and the separation of church and state. After serving as a wartime governor of Virginia and as a member of Congress, he succeeded Franklin as minister to France, where he published his Notes on Virginia (1784-85), still considered a valuable source of information about the natural history of Virginia as well as about 18th century political and social life. Perhaps the most versatile of the founding fathers, he is remembered for his faith in the capacity of the people to govern themselves through representative institutions.