The Documents

Religious Revolutions

Summa Theologiae

Summa Theologiae

Summa theologiae, Pars secunda, prima pars. (copy by Peter Schaffer, 1471)

Short Description

Composed by one of the most prominent thinkers of the later Middle Ages, the Summa Theologiae of Aquinas (d. 1274) attempts to reconcile Christian faith with the rationalist philosophy of Aristotle. In doing so, Aquinas contributed immeasurably to the movement known as Scholasticism, a form of intellectual practice that played a key role in the rise of the modern university.

Remnant Trust Description

The Italian Dominican scholastic theologian and philosopher Thomas Aquinas (d. 1274) was not only the most prominent intellectual figure of the later Middle Ages but is considered by many to have been the most preeminent theologian of the Roman Catholic Church. Intended to serve as a primer for students of theology, his Summa theologiae, left unfinished at his death, comprises a systematic treatment of all known theological questions of the time. The novel, and certainly the most controversial, aspect of the work is its attempt to reconcile Christian faith with the rationalist philosophy of Aristotle and his commentators. As a religious and philosophical movement, Scholasticism had a formative and wide-ranging impact on the development of Western intellectual discourse as well playing a key role in the rise of the modern university. The copy here is dated to 1496.